Brexit: Ministers vow to fight Article 50 court ruling

The government has said it will fight a High Court ruling that could frustrate its timetable for Brexit, claiming that voters want them to “get on with it”.
Three judges ruled that Parliament, not the government alone, can trigger the formal process of leaving the EU.

Brexit Secretary David Davis said 17.4 million Leave voters had given the government “the biggest mandate in history” to leave the EU.

The Supreme Court is expected to hear the government’s appeal next month.
In the landmark ruling, the High Court judges said the government could not trigger the Article 50 process of formally leaving the European Union alone – they must have the approval of Parliament.

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BBC political editor Laura Kuenssberg described the ruling as a “massive obstacle” for Prime Minister Theresa May, who says she wants to trigger Article 50 by the end of March.

If the government loses in the Supreme Court, it will have to publish some form of new law for MPs – and the House of Lords – to vote on. MPs could then push to set the terms for negotiating withdrawal.

The prime minister’s spokeswoman said she would be calling President of the EU Commission, Jean-Claude Juncker, to say she intended to stick to her March 2017 deadline for triggering Article 50.

BBC political editor Laura Kuenssberg described the ruling as a “massive obstacle” for Prime Minister Theresa May, who says she wants to trigger Article 50 by the end of March.

If the government loses in the Supreme Court, it will have to publish some form of new law for MPs – and the House of Lords – to vote on. MPs could then push to set the terms for negotiating withdrawal.

The prime minister’s spokeswoman said she would be calling President of the EU Commission, Jean-Claude Juncker, to say she intended to stick to her March 2017 deadline for triggering Article 50.